Unfortunately, yesterday 1st of July Google Reader has stopped. This post will explain what you need to do to backup your subscriptions from Google reader and suggest alternative RSS Feed Readers. The alternative Readers are web-based and a summary will be provided for each one.

So,, let’s get started

The first thing that you need to do (instantly) is to download a backup for your Google Reader subscriptions.

How you can do this?

  • Simply, just visit Google Takeout.
  • Choose Services
  • Select service Reader
  • Create archive

When you unzip the archive file you will find inside a subscriptions.xml, this file will be used in order to import your subscriptions to the new RSS Feed Readers.

What are the alternatives?

Several web-based Reader have been tested but I suggest the following alternatives because are easy to use, they are pretty much closed to Google Reader layout and simply because they do the job.

Feedly

  • Feedly is free
  • You can use it on desktop in Chrome, Firefox or Android and iOS devices
  • You can save posts
  • You can tag posts
  • Search for feeds
  • Organize by creating categories of your subscriptions
  • Share to social networks

The Old Reader

  • Old Reader is free
  • You can use it on desktop in Chrome, Firefox,etc.
  • Share to social networks

 

Digg  Reader

  • Easy subscriptions import from Google Reader
  • Digg Reader is free you can download it from here
  • You can use it on desktop in Chrome, Firefox,etc.
  • Share to social networks

FeedSpot

  • Feedspot basic use is  free but you can upgrade to Gold for $1.99 per month which includes advanced features.
  • Easy import of your Google Reader subscriptions (basically one click and does this automatically for you)
  • You can use it on desktop in Chrome, Firefox,etc.
  • Share to social networks
  • You can star (featured) posts

There are several web-based RSS readers out there but my choice is Feedly. Purely because is as simple it can be and the smartphone version is actually very good choice.